[EM] Electoral Fusion and multiwinner races

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[EM] Electoral Fusion and multiwinner races

robert bristow-johnson

This is a question my wife came up with and I cannot answer.

Okay, we know what Electoral Fusion is.  Here's a good example that I can point to:

In the 1990's a New York state gubernatorial candidate, George Pataki, appeared two places on the ballot for Governor as both the GOP nominee and the Conservative Party nominee.  This was a single winner election, voters were instructed to vote for only one candidate, but the state recognized that GOP George was the same person as Conservative George and the vote totals for both Georges were added together to get the vote total that his opponent would need to beat (and was unsuccessful doing so).

Now, while it seems to me to be unfair that George gets more real estate on the ballot than other candidates, since each voter can cast only one vote and both Georges are the same George, it doesn't seem so unfair that the two tallies are added to a single tally.

But what about multiwinner elections where each voter is instructed to vote for no more than two or no more than three (or in my state senate district, the largest in the U.S. in terms of seats, no more than six), and the top two or three (or six) vote-getters are elected to office?  if a candidate wins the nomination for more than one party and gets ballot access for each party nominee and appears twice on the multiwinner ballot, is it possible that a single voter can vote twice for the same candidate, but running as different party nominees, and would those "two" candidates be treated separately, or would they add the two and this single candidate be able to pull two votes out of a single voter?

How do these Electoral Fusion states handle this?

Just curious.  It seems to me that the only decent way that this can be consistently dealt with is to always list the candidate ONCE and, under the candidate name, list all of the parties that have nominated him.

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r b-j                  [hidden email]
 
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Re: [EM] Electoral Fusion and multiwinner races

Jack Santucci
Good question. Vermont and Idaho may hold the answer, as these are the states with both fusion and MMDs.

As an aside, when New York City had PR-STV, it also had the cross-endorsement version of fusion. Somewhere, I have seen a sample ballot that shows each candidate just once, in the manner you note.

Jack

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 3, 2020, at 20:22, robert bristow-johnson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> 
> This is a question my wife came up with and I cannot answer.
>
> Okay, we know what Electoral Fusion is.  Here's a good example that I can point to:
>
> In the 1990's a New York state gubernatorial candidate, George Pataki, appeared two places on the ballot for Governor as both the GOP nominee and the Conservative Party nominee.  This was a single winner election, voters were instructed to vote for only one candidate, but the state recognized that GOP George was the same person as Conservative George and the vote totals for both Georges were added together to get the vote total that his opponent would need to beat (and was unsuccessful doing so).
>
> Now, while it seems to me to be unfair that George gets more real estate on the ballot than other candidates, since each voter can cast only one vote and both Georges are the same George, it doesn't seem so unfair that the two tallies are added to a single tally.
>
> But what about multiwinner elections where each voter is instructed to vote for no more than two or no more than three (or in my state senate district, the largest in the U.S. in terms of seats, no more than six), and the top two or three (or six) vote-getters are elected to office?  if a candidate wins the nomination for more than one party and gets ballot access for each party nominee and appears twice on the multiwinner ballot, is it possible that a single voter can vote twice for the same candidate, but running as different party nominees, and would those "two" candidates be treated separately, or would they add the two and this single candidate be able to pull two votes out of a single voter?
>
> How do these Electoral Fusion states handle this?
>
> Just curious.  It seems to me that the only decent way that this can be consistently dealt with is to always list the candidate ONCE and, under the candidate name, list all of the parties that have nominated him.
>
> --
>
> r b-j                  [hidden email]
>
> "Imagination is more important than knowledge."
> ----
> Election-Methods mailing list - see https://electorama.com/em for list info
----
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Re: [EM] Electoral Fusion and multiwinner races

robert bristow-johnson


> On February 3, 2020 8:37 PM Jack Santucci <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>  
> Good question. Vermont and Idaho may hold the answer, as these are the states with both fusion and MMDs.
>
> As an aside, when New York City had PR-STV, it also had the cross-endorsement version of fusion. Somewhere, I have seen a sample ballot that shows each candidate just once, in the manner you note.
>

Well, I live in Vermont, and we have a few Progs that have also gotten endorsements from the Democratic party in their district, but their name is shown ONLY ONCE on the ballot.  There is no way for a single voter to vote for that candidate more than once.

But in New York, at least for the Governor's race (and I presume every other single-winner race), a candidate with endorsement from different parties can get their name listed again for each party, assuming that they satisfied the basic ballot access requirements in terms of valid signatures on a ballot petition.

In Vermont, the issue for ballot access (the number if signatures on a petition) and party endorsement are two totally different issues.  A candidate running as Prog and Dem need not get twice the number of minimum signatures.  The number of signatures is the same, but the candidate must be shown as endorsed by the party in the official party caucus results to be listed as multiple-party endorsed.

--
 
r b-j                  [hidden email]
 
"Imagination is more important than knowledge."
----
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